Ciao Asmara

 Short-listed for the 2003 Thomas Cook Travel Book Award

The Globalist feature 

This book will stand beside Philip Gouravitch’s Rwandan book, WE WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT TOMORROW YOU WILL BE KILLED WITH YOUR FAMILIES, as a classic account of contemporary Africa.

 

This exquisite narrative … has all the bittersweet anger and gratitude of Orwell’s escape from Barcelona [in Homage to Catalonia]‘ Independent

‘Kapuscinski unforgettably recorded the demise of Haile Selassie … Hill’s book is the next best thing written about this benighted and beguiling’ Observer

‘Justin Hill has a keen eye for detail … the novel is extraordinarily well crafted’ Observer

 

Asmara is the capital of Eritrea – a surreally Italian city at the centre of an ex-Italian colony that has been at war with its neighbour Ethiopia (who claim sovereignty over Eritrea) for over ten years. Amidst broken palaces (built by the late Ethiopian emperor Haile Selassie), nomadic desert encampments and war-torn towns, Hill found a god-fearing people remarkably resistant to everything fate has thrown at them. This book is a tribute to their resilience and will stand beside Philip Gouravitch’s Rwandan book, WE WISH TO INFORM YOU THAT TOMORROW YOU WILL BE KILLED WITH YOUR FAMILIES, as a classic account of contemporary Africa..

Standfords Bookshop

Independent

Irish Business Post


This exquisite narrative … has all the bittersweet anger and gratitude of Orwell’s escape from Barcelona [in Homage to Catalonia]‘ Independent

‘Kapuscinski unforgettably recorded the demise of Haile Selassie … Hill’s book is the next best thing written about this benighted and beguiling place’ Observer

The tone is low key, but the story it tells is anything but that: a brief and beautiful moment of calm between storms’ Sunday Times

Vivid and engaging’ Big Issue

Hill is a great and passionate storyteller, and his account is both readable and important’ Independent on Sunday

‘a beautiful tapestry woven from historical fact and personal testimony. It is a captivating memoir tinged with tragedy and regret. Hill’s parting message rings out loud and clear: beneath the confusion, destruction and chaos, there lies a culture crying out for recognition.’ Chingford Guardian. Mark Collins

 

 

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